More about In:Site

Supporting new graduates

“The audience response to my work was very positive. It was good to be there on the day making, seeing the process adds a whole new level of interest for people. For me technique is just as important as final piece so it was nice to be given the opportunity to show this. I think that finishing University and being out in the real world can be quite daunting. In:Site gave me something positive to look forward to and gave me a boost to keep making.” Amber Wakley 2012 exhibiting graduate.

The festival provides graduates with a valuable early career gain and profile for their portfolio. They directly benefit from being able to test the viability of ideas, go through the process of a live commission, respond to a brief and a specific site, and engage with the public at first hand. As this year marks the Cathedral’s tercentenary, many of the graduates will incorporate the rich themes and history surrounding the Cathedral’s 300 years in the city within their installations.

“The location for the In:Site festival was perfect, there were lots of people buzzing about, stopping to look at the work and ask questions. I had a lot of positive feedback. Taking part in In:Site has allowed me to build up my portfolio, taught me how to showcase my work in a public art setting  and has given me the confidence to consider projects like this in the future as I hadn’t even thought about it before now. It’s been both inspiring and enjoyable.”
Samantha Wilson 2012 exhibiting graduate.

Graduates have not always had the opportunity through their coursework to consider socially engaged practice or creating public art. Craftspace is often involved in commissioning public art or bespoke work for particular settings. Clients require a level of experience and track record and we are often unable to appoint new graduates for these opportunities. The context and brief for In:Site provides graduates with the chance to test the viability of ideas, go through the process of a live commission, respond to a brief and a specific site and engage with the public at first hand. They also learn about risk assessment, contracts, working with an arts organisation and positioning their practice. Having something credible on their CV soon after leaving college is definitely a benefit. Working with a well-established organisation like Craftspace means that new graduates can tap into our extensive curatorial expertise and knowledge of the cultural sector as well as our networks and resources. We can often signpost people to further opportunities. Deirdre Figueiredo, Director, Craftspace

Past commissions have included a contemporary response to lacemaking; creating outsized stitches directly onto the bark of a tree using nails and threads, and “Chain Reaction” in which passers-by were invited to have their portraits embroidered with the use of a sewing machine. The sitter was required to generate the electricity needed to power the sewing machine by pedaling on a specially adapted cycle.

In 2015 Jessica Hargreaves used In:Site to develop her work making pewter jewellery. Watch more videos on the YouTube playlist.

Working in Partnership

Beginning as a one day event featuring only three graduates, In:Site quickly grew in partnership with Birmingham Cathedral into a five day festival, attracting new makers from colleges across the country.

The festival has been supported by Colmore Business District (CBD) since the first event in 2011 to 2015 to welcome positive activity to the grounds of Birmingham Cathedral.

Thank you to our previous supporters:
Colmore Business District
Feeney Trust
Saintbury Trust
Edward Cadbury Trust
Oakley Trust

Birmingham Cathedral Square

The Cathedral Square is a major city thoroughfare and meeting point with as many as twenty thousand people passing through and spending time in the public space each day. It is the perfect venue for In:Site to attract a new audience to contemporary craft, and create an environment to encounter unique cultural experiences.



Where Next?

Apply for In:Site

Apply to take part in In:Site 2021-22

A young woman crouches over a memorial stone, she is pouring molten metal into the carved patterns.


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